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Coronary Artery Disease (CAD)

3D illustration of Heart – Part of Human Organic.

Heart Disease is a chronic condition that is one of the leading causes of death in the United States. Heart Disease describes the different types of heart conditions. Heart conditions that are often associated with Heart Disease are Arrhythmia, Atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), Cardiomyopathy, Congenital heart defects, Coronary artery disease (CAD), and Endocarditis (Heart infection). Coronary artery disease is the most common type of Heart Disease in the United States, about 18.2 million adults aged 20 and older have CAD[1]

 

Plaque build-up along the walls of our arteries can cause coronary artery disease.  Cholesterol and other material within our arteries make up these plaques. As the plaques continue to deposit in the lining of our artery walls, that build-up can cause our arteries to narrow over time to where blood flow within the artery is either partially blocked or completely blocked. In a healthy artery wall, the cells are smooth and elastic, which allows for blood to flow with no issues. Chest pain and discomfort are two typical signs and symptoms of CAD. For most people, a heart attack is often the first clue that they may have CAD. Those symptoms are chest pain, shortness of breath, pain or discomfort in the arm or shoulder, and light-headedness. Over time, CAD can weaken the heart muscles to the point where the heart cannot pump blood properly, thus causing heart failure[2]. There are many diagnostic tests that a physician can use to diagnose the onset of CAD. A few standard tests are an electrocardiogram (ECG), Echocardiogram, and Cardiac CT scan.

 

There are many risk factors associated with CAD. Age, sex, family history, smoking, blood pressure, cholesterol levels, weight, activity levels, and stress are all essential factors that play a role in the onset of CAD. Family history is one risk factor to pay close attention to. A familial history of heart disease is often associated with a higher risk of CAD. If your brother or father is diagnosed with heart disease before the age of 55 or if your mother or sister is diagnosed with heart disease before the age of 65, you’re at an increased risk[3]. Blood pressure and cholesterol also play an essential role in the onset of CAD. Individuals with uncontrolled high blood pressure can result in the hardening of their arteries. High cholesterol not controlled can result in the formation of plaques along the walls of our arteries, causing Atherosclerosis. With uncontrolled high blood pressure and cholesterol, they can lead to blocked arteries and a heart attack’s common signs. Obesity, lack of physical activity, and high-stress levels are also associated with the onset of CAD. Risk factors for CAD often occur together and may trigger other underlying risk factors.

 

When treating and preventing CAD, there are many different factors to take into account. Lifestyle changes such as quitting smoking, maintaining a healthy weight, and lowering your blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugar are critical steps to prevent CAD. Regular physical exercise and a diet rich in fresh fruits and vegetables with very few processed foods help prevent CAD. Limiting both your sodium and sugar intake can help lower both your blood pressure and blood sugar[4]. Medications such as Aspirin and Beta-blockers help treat and maintain CAD. Aspirin is a blood thinner that can help reduce blood clots’ frequency, potentially helping prevent the obstruction of your coronary artery. Beta-blockers help slows down our heart rate and decreases our blood pressure, reducing our heart’s demand for oxygen[5]. Maintaining a healthy diet, moderate physical activity, and taking medication can help prevent or treat CAD.

[1] Heart disease facts. (2020, September 08). Retrieved February 04, 2021, from https://www.cdc.gov/heartdisease/facts.htm

[2] Coronary artery disease. (2019, December 09). Retrieved February 04, 2021, from https://www.cdc.gov/heartdisease/coronary_ad.htm

[3] Coronary artery disease. (2020, June 05). Retrieved February 08, 2021, from https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/coronary-artery-disease/symptoms-causes/syc-20350613

[4] Prevent heart disease. (2020, April 21). Retrieved February 16, 2021, from https://www.cdc.gov/heartdisease/prevention.htm

[5] Coronary artery disease. (2020, June 05). Retrieved February 16, 2021, from https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/coronary-artery-disease/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20350619

High Blood Pressure – Signs, Symptoms, and Complications

It is important to have regular blood pressure readings taken and to know your numbers, because high blood pressure usually does not cause symptoms until serious complications occur. Undiagnosed or uncontrolled high blood pressure can cause complications such as chronic kidney disease, heart attack, heart failure, stroke, and possibly vascular dementia.

 

 

Sun Safety

 

The sun’s ultraviolet rays can damage your skin in as little as 15 minutes. Follow these recommendations to help protect yourself and your family.

 


Mobile Physician Services

2022 Patient Satisfaction Survey

 

 Patient Satisfaction Survey 2022

We are interested in receiving your feedback about the care provided by our office. Please take a few minutes to complete this online survey. Your responses are very important to us. We will be using the feedback you provide to make improvements to ensure we offer an exceptional experience for our patients in the future. Once completed click the “Submit Survey” icon at the bottom of the survey page.

 

  Click here to begin the Survey 

 

 

If you have any immediate questions or concerns, please call our office at (855) 232-0644.
 
Thank you. We appreciate you taking the time to participate in this important questionnaire.

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Manage Stress

Preventing and managing chronic (ongoing) stress can help lower your risk for serious health problems like heart disease, obesity, high blood pressure, and depression.

 

 

caduceus

A Snapshot: Diabetes In The United States

Diabetes

37 million people have diabetes

That’s about 1 in every 10 people

1 in 5 don’t know they have diabetes

Prediabetes

96 million adults – more than 1 in 3  – have prediabetes

More than 8 in 10 adults don’t know they have prediabetes

If you have prediabetes, losing weight by eating healthy and being more active can cut your risk of getting type 2 diabetes in half.

Cost

$327 billion total medical costs and lost work and wages for people with diagnosed diabetes.

Risk of early death for adults with diabetes is 60% higher than for adults without diabetes.

Medical costs for people with diabetes are more than twice as high as for people without diabetes.

People who have diabetes are at higher risk of serious health complications:

  • blindness
  • kidney failure
  • heart disease
  • stroke
  • loss of toes, feet, or legs

Common Types of Diabetes

Type 1

Body doesn’t make enough insulin

  • Can develop at any age
  • No known way to prevent it

In adults, type 1 diabetes accounts for approximately 5-10% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes.

Just over 18,000 youth diagnosed each year in 2014 and 2015

Type 2

Body can’t use insulin properly:

  • Can develop at any age
  • Most cases can be prevented

In adults, type 2 diabetes accounts for approximately 90-95% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes.

More than 6,000 youth diagnosed each year in 2014 and 2015.

1.4 million people 18 years or older diagnosed with diabetes in 2019.

Risk factors for Type 2 diabetes:

  • being overweight
  • having a family history
  • being physically inactive
  • being 45 and older

What can you do?

You can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes

  • lose weight if needed
  • eat healthy
  • be more active

Learn more at www.cdc.gov/diabetes/prevention or speak to your doctor.

You can manage diabetes

  • with with a health professional
  • eat healthy
  • stay active

Learn more at www.cdc.gov/diabetes/managing or speak to your doctor.

 
Page last reviewed: February 18, 2020

CMS Unveils More User-Friendly Medicare Website

Kidney Stones

 

Learn about the causes, symptoms, and diagnosis of kidney stones as well as prevention strategies and treatment options.

 

 
 
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Marlene’s Story | Real Stories | Tips From Former Smokers

 

Marlene smoked and now has macular degeneration. Her full story and her videos are part of CDC’s Tips From Former Smokers campaign

 


 

 

 

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